Consciousness, Communication and Change: In Conversation with Muna Wagner

July 5, 2021 by Promit Ray


The following post features an interview with Muna Wagner;  a freelance trainer, facilitator and writer who works at bringing people closer while celebrating diversity. Consciousness, communication and change form the foundations of Muna’s work and, therefore, also the subject of this post. She is an intercultural trainer imparting skills allowing for smoother communication in international contexts. Her specialty lies in addressing misunderstandings and disputes rooted in cultural, structural, and/or personal backgrounds. She supports organizations as well as individuals in their journey towards progress and change. Muna is an associate at the Impulse Institut Berlin and holds a teaching assignment from the Charité University Hospital Berlin. She also works pro bono for change-maker projects in the UNESCO supported universal township Auroville, South India.

If there are few universal traits to be identified among successful graduates, or young professionals, patience and tenacity would score high up there for most of us. The ability to delay gratification is often thought of as a test of self-control. As students and freshers navigate their way through, and past, graduate school, some patterns might quickly become apparent. Much of our time in grad school is spent waiting for good things to come; papers, scholarships, awards, grants and, of course, graduating. While it is quite perceivable that good things do come to those who wait, it does beg a very important question: how important is it to have the big picture figured out in the context of our smaller steps?

In our interview, we talk about Muna’s journey into consciousness, communication and change. We then focus on ‘bringing people together while celebrating our diversity’ – how important is this in a professional setting? We explore the most common graduate socio-psychological problems that Muna is committed to solving. Self esteem, existential crisis and the importance of knowing ‘where one is going’ are topics Muna sheds insight on as well.

Muna also shares her insights on merging our professional and personal identities, and, hence, connecting to our bodies better. She talks about fully integrating the body, mind and the soul. She also elaborates on how it can bring mental and emotional awareness to professional life.

Muna trains and consults on the following topics:

1.  Intercultural Management: Creating the triple win 

2. Communication: macro and micro levels of (intercultural) communication

3. Conflict Management: individual conflict styles, conflict prevention and resolution models

4. Individual Communication Styles: strengths, weaknesses, and self-development toolkit

5. Team building: group dynamics, team roles, and “the I in team”

6. Leadership: leadership styles, the power of feedback, and self-assessment

7. Change Management: How to through out the old and bring in the new

8. International and interdisciplinary cooperation: efficiency and fun at work through collaboration

9. The Art of Work Life Balance: know yourself, your goals, your strengths and how to find the balance between all

10. Thinking outside of the box – tools for unconventional solutions


Post written by Promit Ray

Promit Ray is a passionate chemistry graduate with a love for scientific writing. He is passionate about observing and learning from patterns in data and greatly enjoys explaining complicated science simply. He is currently at the end of his PhD in computational chemistry at the University of Bonn, Germany following a masters degree from Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, India. A materials scientist by training, he writes on demystifying scientific concepts, careers, and life in the sciences, and generally aims to involve the community in popular science. Always happy to chat about science communication and new projects, he can be reached at promit@amicablescientists.org.

Reply

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: